Click on the session time to view or collapse descriptions. 

Wednesday, August 28


“Whenever I Go Somewhere, I Have to Take My Daughters with Me”—An Enquiry into the Progress and Strategies Used for L2 Literacy Acquisition by Former Refugee Adults in New Zealand
(Research / Demonstration)
This study investigated progress in second language learning between two groups of former refugee adults (0-2 years and 8+ years) in New Zealand with limited L1 literacy. It revealed that those with more prior education progressed slightly faster. Learning strategies used were a blend of traditional approaches and modern technologies.
Presented by: Jenny Field, Waikato Institute of Technology, New Zealand
Room: Butler

Autonomous Learning and Technology with Adult Refugee-Background Students
(Practice / Demonstration / Paper Presentation)
Incorporating digital literacy in the adult refugee-background classroom creates a rich environment enabling learners to benefit from a multi-faceted approach to language learning which includes blended learning and mobile technology, This encourages flexibility, autonomy, and collaboration.
Presented by: Janet Liscio, MA TESOL, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Vermont
Room: Cambria

Community-based Bhutanese Adult Refugee English Literacy Learning: Needs and Strategies
(Research / Demonstration)
This ethnographic study explores the English literacy learning of Bhutanese adult refugees with limited first language literacy and education. The findings present this group of adult refugees distinctive needs, challenges, and teaching strategies.
Presented by: Dr. Xia Chao, Faculty of Education Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
Room: Somerset

LINC Works—Literacy Learner Employment Project and Materials
(Practice / Demonstration)
LINC Works is a project embedding workplace skills into ESL classes to allow for language and skill development for the increased successful integration of literacy learners into the workforce, as well as building skills needed to maintain jobs. Materials will be presented during the session.
Presented by: Kim Chaba-Armstrong, Instructor, NorQuest College and Debbie Severinsen, Instructor, NorQuest College
Room: Butler

Exploring Culture Dialogically in the LESLLA Classroom
(Research / Demonstration)
This presentation explores strategies for teaching and dialoguing about culture in LESLLA classrooms in ways that are not prescriptive or condescending. The presentation will include example activities and learner perceptions, as well as strategies for exploring culture with LESLLA learners.
Presented by: Amanda Shufflebarger Snell, Doctoral Candidate, University of Arizona
Room: Cambria

Artists in Collaboration: Language Learning, Creative Practice, and Community Building
(Practice / Panel Discussion)
The Pittsburgh Office of Public Art organized a residency in the Public Realm matching four artists with four organizations that support immigrants and refugees. Participating artists and organizations will reflect on their experiences and takeaways for other adult language learning contexts.
Presented by: Mary Tremonte, Artist in Residence–Literacy Pittsburgh / Office of Public Art
Room: Somerset

Literacy and Social Semiotics: Meaning-Making in Local Classroom Language and Literacy Assessments
(Research / Demonstration)
This research explores how LESLLA learners make meaning from multimodal assessment texts used in a local English as a Second Language and English literacy program for refugee-background adults. The study investigates meaning-making from a social semiotic and multimodal design perspective.
Presented by: Jenna A. Altherr Flores, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Arizona
Room: Westmoreland

Meet Literacy Pittsburgh students while making conference tote bags on site at Literacy Pittsburgh’s Downtown Learning Center. Enjoy light refreshments and talk to students about their experiences in class and living in Pittsburgh. Share your own experiences in a relaxed classroom environment while helping our students practice English listening and speaking skills in an authentic context. A sign-up sheet will be at the registration desk.
Supporting Students with Interrupted Formal Education
(Practice / Workshop)
What is meant by “interrupted formal education?” This introductory workshop will share about the two main groups of English learners in the United States who have interrupted education (Latinos and refugees). We will explore the many reasons their schooling has been disrupted, and we offer specific suggestions for classroom supports. Special focus will be given to young adult learners (ages 15-22) in the context of U.S. schools.
Presented by: Dr. Brenda Custodio, Professor, Ohio State University and Judith O’Loughlin, Language Matters Education Consultants, LLC
Room: Butler

To Define Is to Know: Shifting the Mindset of LESLLA Learners Towards School-Based Ways of Thinking
(Practice / Workshop)
Participants will engage in a methodical, explicit set of activities designed to (1) move LESLLA learners from pragmatic tasks to school-based decontextualized tasks; and (2) shift their ways of thinking grounded in lived experience to the formal ways of thinking of school and the workplace.
Presented by: Dr. Andrea DeCapua, Adjunct Assistant Professor, New York University and Dr. Helaine Marshall, Professor, Long Island University Hudson
Room: Cambria

Interactive Literacy Activities: Making Learning Fun for Families
(Practice / Workshop)
Interactive literacy activities are an important instructional strategy for supporting immigrant parents and their children’s language and literacy development. Participants will learn how to create and deliver engaging and fun interactive literacy activities in this “hands on” workshop.
Presented by: Dr. Carol Clymer, Co-Director Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy, Goodling Institute for Research in Family Literacy, Penn State University; Dr. Elizabeth Grinder, Early Childhood Specialist, Penn State University; Emily Wolfe, Adult Education Family Literacy Coordinator, Penn State University; and Dr. Anna Kaiper, Associate Director, Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy and the Goodling Institute for Research in Family Literacy, Penn State University
Room: Somerset

Ways to Use the Heritage Language Hub in Instruction With LESLLA Learners
Practice / Workshop
Participants will learn about an online hub of heritage language resources. Using a set of guidelines on using the hub, they will access the hub online, consider ways to use it in instruction, and discuss ways the hub can be improved and how they can get involved in building the resources.
Presented by: Dr. Joy Kreeft Peyton, Senior Fellow Center for Applied Linguistics and Fernanda Minuz, Johns Hopkins University–SAIS Europe (retired).
Room: Wesmoreland

Education and Literacy as Metonyms for English: Adult Basic Education and Domestic Workers in South Africa
(Research / Demonstration/Paper Presentation)
This study draws from ethnographic research over a three-year span to understand South African domestic workers motivations for taking English language literacy classes. Narratives of 28 domestic workers are examined through a critical, ethnographic lens.
Presented by: Dr. Anna Kaiper, Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy, The Pennsylvania State University
Room: Butler

Developing Autonomous Learning Skills and Content Knowledge in Adolescent SIFEs
(Research / Demonstration)
This case study explores different ways to help students with interrupted or inconsistent formal education (SIFEs) develop autonomous learning skills and self advocacy in their education.
Presented by: Areum Kang, Teacher, Manhattan International High School and Dr. Christine Rosalia
Room: Cambria

Let’s Go to the Library! Building Connections to Community Resources Through Field Trips
(Practice / Demonstration)
The Language Experience Approach and the use of storytelling in class provide meaningful location-based content and encourages learners to create their own story. Attendees will review a curricular unit designed to introduce students to the local library branch in an experiential field trip.
Presented by: Kate Shea, Refugee Education Program Instructor, Pima Community College
Room: Somerset

College & Career Readiness Standards in the LESLLA Classroom: New Videos for Teachers!
(Practice / Demonstration)
How should standards “look” in a LESLLA classroom? Come learn about a new classroom video series that demonstrates CCRS English Language Arts standards with LESLLA learners. We’ll highlight scaffolding and routines, and the lesson plans and supporting materials are free and available online!
Presented by: Dr. Patsy Egan, Director, ATLAS and Andrea Echelberger, Minnesota Literacy Council
Room: Westmoreland

Thursday, August 29


The Access Paradox: Providing Access and Promoting Linguistic Diversity in Non- Formal Education
(Research / Demonstration)
This qualitative study investigates how community-based organizations in the United States are providing immigrants with access to the English language while recognizing and promoting the diverse languages and literacies that students bring with them.
Presented by: Alexis Cherewka, PhD student in Lifelong Learning and Adult Education, Penn State University
Room: Butler

Beyond “Survival”: Affordances of Creativity in LESLLA Classrooms
(Research / Demonstration)
Though materials for LESLLA learners often focus on English for “survival” purposes, creative activities provide humanizing, engaging learning. This session will explore the benefits of creative tasks in LESLLA classrooms, including examples from the presenter’s classroom as well as learner perceptions.
Presented by: Amanda Shufflebarger Snell, Doctoral Candidate, University of Arizona
Room: Cambria

Mobilising Students in the Face of the Refugee Crisis—A New Approach to Language Acquisition
(Practice / Demonstration)
Refugee populations living in the developed world and seeking to learn English provide a new community who further the need for a more comprehensive understanding of LESLLA. North East Solidarity and Teaching (N.E.S.T) is a Newcastle University Students Union student volunteer led refugee project which has made steps towards this and we would like to share our journey
Presented by: Bridget Stratford and Ellie Mahoney, N.E.S.T Project Leads
Room: Somerset

Using Ed Tech to Support LESLLA: Findings from Field Testing Promising Tools
(Research / Demonstration)
The presentation describes a field test of educational technologies, which explored affordances needed to support adult learners who have limited educational experience and literacy. Findings highlight design and implementation required to support learner engagement and persistence in learning.
Presented by: Dr. Jenifer Vanek, Director of Digital Learning and Research World Education, Inc.
Room: Westmoreland

Meet Literacy Pittsburgh students while making conference tote bags on site at Literacy Pittsburgh’s Downtown Learning Center. Enjoy light refreshments and talk to students about their experiences in class and living in Pittsburgh. Share your own experiences in a relaxed classroom environment while helping our students practice English listening and speaking skills in an authentic context. A sign-up sheet will be at the registration desk.
Principles & Practice for SIFE with Developing Literacy
(Practice / Workshop)
Bridges has developed a curriculum for SIFE with Developing Literacy (SDL). This curriculum supports teens who arrive in the U.S. with home language literacy at or below 3rd grade. We will present our two-course design and the researched-based principles and practices that characterize it.
Presented by: Suzanna McNamara, Senior Instructional Coach, Bridges to Academic Success and Virginia Skrelja, Senior Instructional Coach, Bridges to Academic Success
Room: Butler

“I’m Lost, Miss”: Using a LESLLA Toolkit to Make Cultural Connections in the ABE Classroom
(Practice / Workshop)
Like LESLLA teachers, U.S. Adult Basic Education (ABE) teachers must address a range of culturally-influenced needs, perspectives, experiences, and learning preferences in their classes. This workshop will present and discuss ways that a teacher’s LESLLA toolkit can improve instruction and learning for ABE students.
Presented by: Katherine Murphy, Instructor, Literacy Pittsburgh
Room: Cambria

Preparing Volunteers for Success: Effective Training Activities for LESLLA volunteers
(Practice / Workshop)
LESLLA learners provide a unique set of challenges for tutors. In this interactive workshop, learn effective and engaging practices to prepare volunteers to work with emergent readers. Participants will leave with activities for building empathy, reducing teacher talk, and delivering instructions.
Presented by: Andrea Echelberger, ESL Training Coordinator, Minnesota Literacy Council
Room: Somerset

Benchmarking the European Framework for Literacy and Second Language
(Practice / Workshop)
Audience participates in assessing validity, transparency and difficulty level of a sample of the descriptors for communicative language activities (oral and written), technical literacy, strategies, digital competence and mediation from the European Framework on Literacy and Second Language.
Presented by: Dr. Rola Naeb, Senior Lecturer Northumbria University; Dr. TainaTammelin-Laine, University of Jyvaskyla, Centre for Applied Language Studies; and Dr. Fernanda Minuz, Senior Lecturer, Johns Hopkins University–SAIS Europe (retired)
Room: Westmoreland

Multilingual Students with Interrupted Formal Education: Language Use and Instruction
(Research / Demonstration)
Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFE) bring much-needed diversity and challenge to our secondary classrooms. In this interactive session, current, empirical SIFE research will be explored, with particular emphasis on best methods and practice to help these students persist in school.
Presented by: Dr. Beth Clark-Gareca, Assistant Professor of TESOL, SUNY- New Paltz
Room: Butler

LESLLA Voices: Building the Host Community Knowledge Base
(Practice / Demonstration/Paper Presentation)
This session emphasizes the role of refugee-background students’ voices and perspectives in educating members of host communities about the newcomers’ assets, needs, goals, and cultures. The presenters will share their work with two unique populations of high school and adult refugee-background learners. In the case of the high school students, ELLs used their voice and creativity to inform teachers about their experiences by simply answering the question: What do you wish your teachers knew about you? In the case of the adult learners, a project-based learning approach was taken to create a tool—a text—to build background knowledge within the local community about the Congolese newcomers with whom they share space and time. Attendees will have the opportunity to brainstorm approaches to engage learners in creating such tools for community education within their contexts.
Presented by: Dr. Raichle Farrelly, Senior Instructor, University of Colorado–Boulder and Rachel Hurwitz, Graduate Student, Saint Michael’s College
Room: Cambria

LESLLA Learners’ Access to Healthcare: Insights from Participants in the Health Literacy Partnership
(Research / Demonstration)
A partnership with healthcare practitioners and LESLLA learners and instructors aims to improve health literacy outcomes of LESLLA immigrants and refugees in Canada. Insights from participant focus groups reveal opportunities to improve access to services and engage in meaningful, shared learning.
Presented by: Monica Leong, Project Coordinator, Health Literacy Partnership, Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association
Room: Somerset

The Development of an Agricultural-Based Literacy Programs in Petit-Goave, Haiti
(Research / Demonstration/Paper Presentation)
Among adults in Petit-Goave, illiteracy borders 65–80%, creating a great need for education in Haitian Kreyol literacy instruction. Three literacy centers (Sant Alfa) were developed. The use of environmental resources and agriculture were the basis for the development of basic literacy skills.
Presented by: Dr. Edwidge Bryant, Associate Professor, Flagler College
Room: Butler

Cohesive Instruction Through Shared Curriculum
(Practice / Demonstration/Paper Presentation)
Learn how a shared multi-level curriculum focused on daily life topics can create a more rigorous and cohesive learning experience for LESLLA students and a unified teaching experience for instructors. We’ll share objectives and model effective scaffolded activities for the ESL classroom.
Presented by: Nancy Krygowski, ESL Instructor Literacy Pittsburgh and Julie Teixeira, ESL Instructor, Literacy Pittsburgh
Room: Cambria

Refugee-Background Women’s Multiliteracy Practices: Intertextuality and Mobile Device Use
(Research / Demonstration)
This study examines the literacy practices surrounding mobile devices of women English learners in one U.S.-based LESLLA classroom. Findings demonstrate how learners used mobile technology in sophisticated ways to create intertextual connections in order to complete academic tasks.
Presented by: Dr. Nicole Pettitt, Youngstown State University
Room: Somerset

Intercultural Communication in Health Literacy: A Public Health Implication
(Research / Demonstration/Paper Presentation)
The presentation covers intercultural communications as defined by the complexities of power and oppression explored within communication concepts in health literacy and public health. Research data is provided to connect LESLLA learners with intercultural communication and improved resources.
Presented by: Dr. Dawn Brubaker, DAYbreaking IDEAS
Room: Westmoreland

Showcasing Metalinguistic Knowledge and Expression in LESLLA Learners: A Discourse Analytic Approach
(Research / Demonstration)
Previous studies on adults have concluded L1 literacy affects metalinguistic awareness; however, this understanding can develop over time. This study showcases LESLLA learners mutually constructing metalinguistic knowledge and effectively articulating their comprehension despite limited L2 oracy.
Presented by: Lisa Gonzalves, PhD candidate, University of California, Davis
Room: Butler

Refugees: “We Also Have Interesting Stories to Share”
(Practice / Demonstration)
Speaking is a challenging skill that requires much effort. It becomes easier when teachers invoke learners’ background and culture and engage them in fun speaking activities in a stress-free environment whereby they can share their experiences and bring forth interesting stories.
Presented by: Alia Hadid, Doctoral Candidate, University of South Florida
Room: Cambria

Preparing and Developing Teachers and Tutors to Work with Adult Emergent Readers: Our Work Continues
(Practice / Demonstration)
This presentation reports on the EU-Speak Board’s efforts to sustain its online professional development modules on adult emergent readers. The Board is an international partnership of scholars working to make a difference for immigrant and refugee background adults with little formal education.
Presented by: Dr. Susan Watson, ESOL Specialist, Virginia Commonwealth University and Dr. Rola Naeb, Northumbria University
Room: Somerset

Refugee Access to Education and Employment in Wales: Barriers and Opportunities
(Research / Demonstration/Paper Presentation)
This presentation reports on research conducted into the barriers to education and employment faced by participants on the UK government’s refugee resettlement for Syrian families. It discusses the challenges involved in organizing a program of ESOL and puts forward a number of recommendations.
Presented by: Dr. Mike Chick, University of South Wales
Room: Westmoreland

Friday, August 30


Developing Close Reading Skills with Secondary SLIFE
(Practice / Demonstration)
From classroom artifacts, participants will get a fishbowl look at the strengths and weaknesses of close reading strategies used to support SLIFE students reading chapter books. We’ll evaluate the outcomes together and brainstorm adaptations applicable to your specific classroom. Handouts will be provided.
Presented by: Diana Mora, Kansas City, Missouri Public Schools
Room: Butler

Digital Decade and L2 Finnish Literacy Classes—A Threat Or an Opportunity?
(Research / Demonstration)
The demonstration discusses two sub-studies implemented in the project “Getting a grip on basic skills”. The presentation focuses on LESLLA learners’ ICT skills and teachers’ views on using technology in LESLLA classrooms. The audience will be given time to share their thoughts related to the topic.
Presented by: Dr. Taina Tammelin-Laine, Research Coordinator, University of Jyväskylä, Centre for Applied Language Studies and Minna Bogdanoff, University of Jyväskylä, Centre for Applied Language Studies
Room: Cambria

English for Self-Defense: Integrating Know Your Rights Training into Language Acquisition
(Practice / Demonstration/Paper Presentation)
Discussion on human dignity and the rights of non-citizens can help alleviate some of the fear created by anti-immigrant rhetoric, policies, and actions. This session presents resources and practical ideas for integrating Know Your Rights workshops into programs and classrooms
Presented by: Dr. Heide Wrigley, Researcher Literacywork International
Room: Somerset

Time and Sequence—Particular Challenges of Instruction for the Lowest LESLLA Learners
(Practice / Demonstration/Paper Presentation)
Often in practice, the lowest level LESLLA learner attends class the most sporadically. This is to the learner’s detriment, especially for the sequencing of important information. This session aims to explore best practices for building a basic education for students with irregular attendance.
Presented by: Elza Hess, ESL Literacy Teacher, Pittsburg Adult Education Center
Room: Westmoreland

Meaning-Making in Official U.S. Naturalization Test Study Materials: A Case Study of LESLLA Learners
(Research)
This research explores how six LESLLA learners engage with official US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) naturalization test study cards, and how US naturalization assessment practices may be inadvertently biased against individuals with limited/extremely different literacy experiences.
Presented by: Jenna A. Altherr Flores, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Arizona

Preliterate ESL Learning Perceptions Inside & Outside of School Settings
(Research)
The primary interest of this study is to examine the beliefs of preliterate immigrant adults on their own learning. Additionally, the study will examine the beliefs of preliterate adult immigrants on their children’s learning. I will present the data collected through qualitative interviews.
Presented by: Ms. Katrina Benson, Master’s Candidate, Bowling Green State University

What Do Literacy and L2 learners Do with Their Smartphones?
(Research)
Acknowledging that the notion of literacy includes digital literacy, the research aims at analyzing spontaneous and guided use of technologies in educational settings by focusing on the ways literacy influences the use of ICT and the effects of learners’ use of ICT on the ways and pace of learning.
Presented by: Alessandro Borri, Researcher, CPIA Montagna; Giulio Asta, MA; and Fernanda Minuz, Johns Hopkins University–SAIS Europe (retired)

Understanding Volunteer Adult ESL Teachers in Context: An Activity Theoretical Analysis
(Research)
This presentation shares findings from the first stage of an activity theoretical analysis, which seeks to document and explain the various instructional activity systems operating within the volunteer adult literacy center under study in order to develop professional development interventions.
Presented by: Nicolas Doyle, PhD Candidate, Pennsylvania State University

Reflecting on LESLLA Teachers’ Perceptions, Beliefs and Practices in a French Canadian Context
(Research)
This presentation will report on the design and piloting of a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview protocol aiming at collecting data about teachers’ perception of LESLLA students’ characteristics, their beliefs about students’ needs and their declared teaching practices.
Presented by: Véronique Fortier, Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal; Valerié Amireault, Professor, Université du Quebéc à Montréal; and Suzie Beaulieu, Professor, Université Laval

Health Literacy Coalitions for Improving Health in Our LESLLA Communities
(Research)
Health literacy coalitions can leverage practitioners’ expertise to benefit LESLLA populations and address healthcare disparities. But where do you start? Bring your hopes, worries, and questions to this poster session: let our recommendations and resources move you closer to your coalition goals.
Presented by: Monica Leong, Project Coordinator, Health Literacy Partnership Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association and Maricel G.Santos, San Francisco State University

Unofficial Teacher Training in Quebec: What Is Done Behind the Scenes
(Research)
Teacher training and resources are hard to find, or insufficient to face constant waves of refugee immigration coming to Quebec. We report on our investigation on what is developed in terms of professional development and ad-hoc solutions to meet learners’ characteristics.
Presented by: Maude-Amélie Marchand, Master’s degree student, Université Laval and Carl Laberge, Master’s degree student, Université Laval

Designing Research on Learner Perceptions with Adult Emergent Reader Refugee-Background Learners
(Research)
A pilot study with refugee-background learners explored perceptions of group work. What are the opportunities for teacher research with limited formal education-background learners? How do we design effective interviews about classroom concepts for learners in their first classroom experience?
Presented by: Ms. Emily Marderness, Instructor Refugee Education Program

Fake it Until You Make It: SLIFE Strategies for Succeeding in Higher Education
(Research)
This study will provide insight of how adult refugees with interrupted formal education (as known as SLIFE) and limited L1 literacy use particular strategies to overcome various educational barriers in order to succeed in higher education.
Presented by: Desiree Midby, Graduate Student University of Arizona

Building Pathways: Developing Health Care Materials & Curriculum for Refugees
(Research)
This presentation will illustrate the development of health literacy materials and curriculum that are being designed to address the needs of beginning level and emergent reader level refugee learners in classroom settings.
Presented by: Stephanie Mugabonake, Pima Community College Refugee Education Program, Adult Basic Education for College and Career

Classroom Library: Books Chosen and Shared
(Research)
Free voluntary reading has been shown to be beneficial in promoting development for LESLLA readers at all levels. This poster session describes the implementation of a classroom library in a multi-level ESOL families learning class. The presenters emphasize factors for successful replication.
Presented by: Xavier Muñoz, Faculty Support Manager, Literacy Council of Northern Virginia; Elizabeth Magee, Literacy Council of Northern Virginia; and Dr. Carole Bausell, Director of Academic and Student Affairs, Literacy Council of Northern Virginia

Teaching Spanish Literacy to Adult Latinx Learners: Exploring Interest, Impact, Sustainability
(Research)
This presentation reports on a study that explored the benefits and challenges associated with incorporating a pilot Spanish literacy program at a non-profit organization located in Baltimore, MD.
Presented by: Dr. Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Adjunct Professor University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Normalising Fiction Reading in Adult Refugee Populations—A Collaboration with Martha Young-Scholte
(Practice)
Language acquisition can be successful through a variety of media. Creating a safespace for learners to enjoy ESOL can change their perception of the task before them. Through reading fiction books designed specifically for LESLLA learners, N.E.S.T is encouraging new approaches to learning.
Presented by: Ms. Bridget Stratford, N.E.S.T Project Manager, North East Solidarity and Teaching (N.E.S.T); Ms. Ellie Mahoney, North East Solidarity and Teaching (N.E.S.T); and Mr. Phil Hay, Volunteer Coordinator, Newcastle University Students’ Union Go Volunteer

Synthesizing and Sharing Professional Knowledge for Refugee Educators
(Practice / Workshop)
Following a brief review of current scholarship, participants will work in small groups to synthesize their professional knowledge about refugee learners’ needs and effective practices and strategies, creating the beginnings of an open-access forum for the benefit of LESLLA and SLIFE practitioners.
Presented by: Melissa Hauber-Özer, PhD candidate George Mason University and Dr. Kathleen Ramos, George Mason University
Room: Butler

Making Adult ESL Literacy Multisensory
(Practice / Workshop)
Through an interactive, hands-on demonstration, learn how to make and use multisensory materials and strategies, adapted for an adult ESL context, to teach encoding and decoding. Explore how this approach might easily be embedded into your program, even in leveled classes where literacy skills vary.
Presented by: Susan B. Johnson, ESL Teacher / Vocational Coach, Literacy Coalition of Central Texas and Karen Green, Family Literacy Manager, El Buen Samaritano
Room: Cambria

TAP into Workplace Literacy
(Practice / Workshop)
Workplace literacy is crucial for LESLLA learners to be employed and earn a living. Teachers need strategies to teach work-related literacy. Presenters demonstrate learner-centered, cooperative learning strategies that teach skill/trade-specific vocabulary for success in workplace contexts.
Presented by: Mr. Shawn Slakk, Author and Consultant, University of Virginia and Dr. Joy Peyton, Senior Fellow, Center for Applied Linguistics
Room: Somerset

Cultivating Teacher Identity Development Through Participatory Filmmaking
(Research / Demonstration)
This presentation centers on a participatory film developed in a third space of a community-based classroom to explore and express fluid identities. The findings reveal that multimodal authoring enabled participants to counter deficit discourses and express diverse perspectives.
Presented by: Andrea Lypka, PhD Candidate, University of South Florida
Room: Butler

Engaging Points of View: Using and Authoring Non-Fiction Virtual Reality Film
(Research / Panel Discussion)
How are commercial virtual reality experiences on migration useful to the critical literacy classroom? What are the multiple points of viewing on production, authoring and consumption? This panel includes producers, subjects, researchers, and teachers using VR in the language classroom.
Presented by: Dr. Christine Rosalia, Associate Professor of TESOL, Hunter College, New York; Brittany D’sa; Areum Kang; and Emma Lao
Room: Westmoreland